Total Recall Query

Discussion in 'Dog Training: Principle and Practice' started by NikkiN, Oct 26, 2016.

  1. NikkiN

    NikkiN Registered Users

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    Hello,

    I was wondering if someone could provide some advice...

    We are just about to start the Total Recall training programme with our 11 month old working cocker spaniel who has a very high pray drive and is becoming very problematic on a walk. We have worked on his recall to the extent where it is relatively good in areas of few distractions to a 210.5 acme whistle. For example, in the home/garden and open areas with short grass..however, if we ever try his recall in woodland or long grass that he could go hunting in or there is wildlife smells he ignores the recall and strays very far out of sight. We probably let him have too much off lead freedom in the first 6 months of his life.

    We are concerned we may have poisoned this recall and We know the book emphasises the importance of starting this new recall commad with a totally new signal/sound. As the 210.5 and 211.5 sound fairly similar, what would you suggest we start using as our "new" signal? We find whistles very useful so are struggling to think of a new technique. Or should we just persevere with the 210.5 and go back to basics and proof this signal further or is it too late?

    It is stressing me out big time as he enjoys his off lead time so much, but i just want to have the knowledge that he will.come back everytime I blow that whistle!!
    Any advice appriciated.


    Thanks
     
  2. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

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    Hello and welcome to the forum.

    You could just change the pips you use for a recall. If you used three previously, start again with 5? Dogs are very good at distinguishing between different patterns - mine have a single peep for stop and sit, three pips for recall and a pip-peep for hunt. Some people (especially with spaniels) also train a "turn", which is often two pips.
     
  3. JulieT

    JulieT Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    Hi there!

    Yep, just start again with a different whistle signal. :)

    Enjoying off lead time, and a 11 month old working cocker who also enjoys legging it are probably incompatible. :)

    I've never met a working cocker owner having trouble with recall that said their dog was anything but 'high prey drive'. :) In fact, I've never met the owner of any working dog struggling with recall that described their dog otherwise. :rolleyes: :D

    The fact of the matter is that for a dog overwhelmed by distractions in the environment, they need to be on a line. My 6 month old show line Labrador (no, I'm not going to claim she is 'high prey drive' :D:D:D ) is on a line on Wimbledon Common because she would ignore her carefully trained recall (trained from 3 weeks old) in the presence of other dogs, crows, pigeons, squirrels, people, footballs, skateboards...it's just what you have to do with an easily distracted dog (regardless of the reason or cause).
     
  4. NikkiN

    NikkiN Registered Users

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    Is prey drive the wrong expression then? He loves to follow his nose for miles then...!!!

    He is back on a long line and has been for a couple of months. But its not ideal! After reading the book it sounds like a longline is not the pernament solution anyway, hence why we are trying to retrain his recall from scratch again starting at basics with a new signal. I think it is going to be alot of hard work but will certainly be worth it in the end!

    Thanks. So I do not need to look into buying a 212 whistle?
     
  5. JulieT

    JulieT Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    My chocolate 100% show line Labrador would follow his nose for miles if I let him, which I don't. No, I don't think he is high prey drive. If I let him do that, he'd just be untrained.

    Excellent start! Best of luck with it.

    I wouldn't bother to switch to new whistle but you can if you want - they are very cheap, so if you are worried, just get another whistle.
     
  6. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

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    I don't think you need to change your whistle, no, just the pattern.

    The owner of this forum, Pippa, has written about spaniels and why she believes they should not be allowed to free run, as a welfare issue. Here is that article and it makes for very interesting reading: http://totallygundogs.com/spaniels-and-why-not-to-walk-them/
     
  7. nice box

    nice box Registered Users

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    I agree with you
     

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