Agility at the playground?

Discussion in 'Agility & Flyball' started by ohthatcat, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. Oberon

    Oberon Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    I've been prompted to read about this, like many others reading this thread, I'm sure.

    You can pick up this parasite from stroking a dog who is infected (and has the eggs in its fur) and then ingesting the eggs that are on your hands*. It's definitely not something that is always or only picked up from poo-contaminated ground. It's important to worm your dogs and also to wash your hands before eating.

    The risk for adults is very low though, given that exposure to the parasite must be very high. No comfort of course to the small number of people who have suffered from an infection...

    *eggs have to be at the right stage of development to be infective though, apparently, either on the dog or in poo. E.g. takes two weeks for the eggs in poo to develop to the infective stage, so older poo is riskier poo.
     
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  2. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

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    Gosh, well, it sounds a very dreadful thing @Cath and so sorry you were impacted by this.

    But, foxes carry this too - and that doesn't seem to stop all the little kids squirming around in the mud on Wimbledon Common (FULL of fox poo), on nature walks and rearranging logs into...er...dunno...some kind of shelters which they might need in case the parents fail to pick them up at 3pm to get them home for tea. :D

    I guess the world has some risks in it and that's dreadful for the people who experience those materialising. I think the most responsible thing you can do is make sure your dog is wormed. And pick up poo, of course, but that's probably for different (very good) reasons.
     
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  3. Cath

    Cath Registered Users

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    Emily I am sure you are a very responsible owner and worm and pick up after Ella.

    I am more worried for Nathan because you don't know if all dog owners who visit the playground are responsible owners. All I know is sight is a very special thing and if you knew how painfully this is, you would not want any child/person to get it. I was under the hospital for 5 years before they signed me off. I would not want dear Nathan to get this. I don't want to upset you but just warn you that other dog owners are not responsible. Please don't take this wrong I don't want to fall out with anyone, but I have had to live with this the last 40 years. I do love children and dogs.
     
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  4. Cath

    Cath Registered Users

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    This may be Rachael, but I didn't have a dog at the time. Like I said I don't want to fall out about this, but just warn people. Once your sight is gone it is gone.

    Its ok Julie life goes on, but if this can save one person sight by warning them by what we have been talking about, it is worth it. I did have to change my job, but shortly after I met this wonderful man, but that's a different story :D
     
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  5. selina27

    selina27 Registered Users

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    That's completely understandable after such a nasty and extremely unlucky experience, it's certainly made me take notice.

    The world is full of risks of course, all we can do is take steps to reduce those risks once we know about them.

    Cassie doesn't need to go play areas etc on a daily basis but I do take her to places where there are children just so she knows humans come in that form as we do see some tiny relatives a couple of times a year. I'm always keen on handwashing after touching dogs but this has definitely made more mindful.
     
  6. Oberon

    Oberon Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    Yes, it has definitely also made me more mindful of hand washing etc., especially after contact with dogs not my own.

    It's a terrible thing that you have had this happen, Cath. Although the risk is low there is obviously still risk.
     
  7. ohthatcat

    ohthatcat Registered Users

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    That's awful! That's why I got so angry when those irresponsible parents and dog owners let their dog pee right on the playground equipment. Come on. He was off leash, too.

    I didn't mean for this to become an upsetting thread. What's interesting is how different playgrounds and playground etiquette is from region to region. In my case, it's pretty dog friendly here but I ONLY let my pup near the equipment when my son is there, too.

    It's hard to watch what your kid puts in their mouths, but I think it's way easier to control where your dog eliminates by paying attention. Most people don't care, which is unfortunate.

    Sunny
     
  8. Oberon

    Oberon Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    Actually, I think that most people do care. I can't actually remember ever seeing a poo in a playground. And compared to when I was a kid (when there was poo absolutely everywhere) you don't see that much poo lying around in the street or in other places either. People have become educated and have changed their behaviour.
     
  9. 20180815

    20180815 Guest

    Wish it was like that here in the UK...at least where I live in the North...the amount of poo in the streets, fields, so on, is outrageous.
     
  10. snowbunny

    snowbunny Registered Users

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    Sadly, it's the same where I am in Spain and Andorra. People think you're crazy for contemplating picking up after your dog. Especially if they do it on grass. I was astounded to se a Spanish man pick up after his dog on the street the other day; first time I've ever seen that. In Andorra, the council are making noises about cracking down on it, by posting street signs stating fines, handing out leaflets etc, but unless there's bodies on the street policing it, I'm not sure they're going to do much good to change people's attitudes.
     
  11. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

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    It's pretty good in London - I very, very rarely see a poo on the streets or even on a path on the Common. I think it's a bit worse in Cornwall where people don't seem to bother quite so much probably because they don't think it matters 'in the country'.
     
  12. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

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    Maybe because it's you are pretty much guaranteed to be on CCTV in London no matter where you are! :D
     
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