Another awkward situation on a walk

Discussion in 'Labrador Training' started by FayRose, Dec 18, 2016.

  1. FayRose

    FayRose Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    479
    Location:
    Devon
    This afternoon we were walking Molly, on the lead, in the grounds of a National Trust property near us. This is part of her 'meeting other people and dogs without going crackers' training as its always busy at the weekend with families and people with dogs.

    All was going fairly well until a dog appeared, off lead, very excited and sent Molly bonkers. Don't misunderstand, he was a lovely dog, some sort of doodle, very poodle like, a big lad. His people, 2 adults and 2 children were some way off, all laughing loudly and happily as their dog sent Molly into a state of near hysteria as she was on the lead and couldn't get away. We were expecting these folks to realise and call their boy back, but no, they clearly thought this was highly amusing.
    I tried to shoo him off and discourage the prancing and leaping, OH who was holding Molly's lead almost tipped over, but in the end I had to call to them to 'Please call him back'. They promptly did and made a huge fuss of him when he went back to them. All very well for them but not so good for Molly.

    I was going to try to explain to them why I asked them to call their dog away but they turned back before I had the chance. I'd hate to think they thought we were unkind to their dog, no intention of that at all, but why can't some people see that you are trying to train and control a young dog and just show a bit of thought. :(

    Right, moan over.
     
    charlie likes this.
  2. Boogie

    Boogie Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    5,553
    Hmmmmmm ...

    Personally I would have let Tatze off and let them play, some people just don't understand training and the dogs may as well have a play than have an awkward encounter imo.

    ...
     
    FayRose likes this.
  3. charlie

    charlie Registered Users

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2012
    Messages:
    9,912
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    I think some people just don't get it, their dog obviously was friendly so think it's OK to allow this behaviour but when you're training it's a bit of a pain.

    David had a situation today when walking Charlie home after his walk. A family coming out of our village pub with the HUGE chocolate Labrador OFF lead on the pavement. The Dad was loading the children into the car, they obviously had no intention of putting their dog back on lead so David walked on the road on the other side of their car only to have the Labrador cut him off give a very grumpy aggressive bark and growl at Charlie, who did bark back :( The owners said "You give her a telling off she needs it" but we DON'T want it as we have worked extremely hard to train Charlie not to react to other dogs. Highly annoying as Charlie had managed to walk past a crazy Springer Spaniel and a Cocker Spaniel without any problem, even having a sniff so they spoilt his training :(

    Tomorrows another day. xx :)
     
    FayRose likes this.
  4. Joy

    Joy Registered Users

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    2,686
    @FayRose They were very inconsiderate and at fault, but as Mags says, I too would have let Molly off in these circumstances. I think it's easy for an on-lead dog to be frightened if another dog is leaping around it.
    I wonder if 'meeting other dogs without going crackers' would be easier to train while walking around towns,nowhere you would hope all dogs would be on lead.
     
    FayRose likes this.
  5. Naya

    Naya Supporting Member Forum Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2013
    Messages:
    7,830
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    I too can understand how frustrating it was for you, but I would also of let Harley off lead and play. When I want to practise lead walking I tend to go to the local shopping centre, walk around parks or through but stick to paths.
    I think the woods is a difficult place as most dogs would be off lead (in my experience), but I would recall Harley straight away if we spotted a dog on lead and would hold her until they were past us or I would change direction.
     
    FayRose likes this.
  6. Cath

    Cath Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2015
    Messages:
    2,089
    Location:
    Cheshire
    I wouldn't of let Annie off her lead, you didn't know the dog or what he was like. Annie is still young and small. Better safe than sorry.
     
    FayRose likes this.
  7. FayRose

    FayRose Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    479
    Location:
    Devon
    Thanks for your replies.

    Yes, my first reaction was to let her off the lead, BUT, Molly goes crackerdog when she gets excited by another dog/dogs off the lead. There were several other families with dogs/children/old folks and my fear was that she would also roar across to them, leap up and could cause a problem, her recall goes totally awal when this happens. She has almost knocked someone over in the past !

    She had become hyper-excited and stressed by this encounter, very quickly.

    Yes, Joy, I think you're right, town walking on the lead would be best.
     
    Naya likes this.
  8. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2013
    Messages:
    22,603
    I would not have let Betsy off her lead. I would not have reinforced Betsy misbehaving on her lead by a play with an off lead dog!

    In this situation, I take hold of Betsy's collar in one hand, and the collar off the off lead dog in the other and separate them. I then look pointedly at the other owner. They usually come and get their dog. If they don't, I tell them to do so. If they still don't, I pour a stack of treats on the floor under the dog's nose, and leave it there stuffing its face while I walk off with Betsy.

    The treat thing only works for friendly dogs and even then once you've got hold of it and interrupted its play.
     
    FayRose likes this.
  9. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2013
    Messages:
    22,603
    Just to say, I would have let Charlie off his lead but this is because he would have just found it easier to ignore and avoid the off lead dog. I wouldn't have done that while I was training him to ignore other dogs though.
     
    FayRose likes this.
  10. FayRose

    FayRose Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    479
    Location:
    Devon
    I'm quite saddened by this incident, its the first time anything quite so worrying has happened to Molly. Since we've been home, she has been unusually subdued, I think that event has upset her more than we realised at first. She is a sensitive little thing, bless her.
     
  11. Xena Dog Princess

    Xena Dog Princess Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2016
    Messages:
    942
    Location:
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Hrm, yeah I wouldn't be doing "ignore other dogs" training on lead in an off-lead area. I realised this evening on our lead walk around the neighbourhood that we never come across dogs on leads on these walks. Lots of "ignore people" training, but the only dogs we get to ignore are dogs barking behind fences/gates. The only "ignore other dogs on lead" training I get to do is at obedience, and that's a controlled environment. I think your best bet (and mine too) is to take Molly to an on-lead pedestrian area that's popular with other dog walkers. I don't think I'm quite brave enough for that yet, myself.
     
    FayRose likes this.
  12. Dawn_Treader

    Dawn_Treader Registered Users

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2016
    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Switzerland
    This is what I do, if a dog is approaching us out of control and just wants to play, if he is aggressive, I throw a bunch a treats at him. This has worked before. Once my foster mixed Shepard broke my finger because I insisted on keeping him on lead when another male was circling us and wanting to fight. The owners were no where in sight. I've experienced a lot of crazy things in our densely populated doggy world. I find the best is to let my dog work it out in her way. The Shepard was another story, and as a street dog, he could and would put up a viscous fight if he felt threatened. I had to put him on his line and shoe off the other dogs.
     
  13. Deejay50

    Deejay50 Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2016
    Messages:
    85
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    I also leave Ted off the lead when approached by other off-lead dogs who want to play, but if I see before he does, a dog on a lead, I will put him on his too. If he sees them first he now invariably goes into submissive crouch first (he's only 7 months) so I can hook his lead on quite quickly. Never second guess other owners, I'm discovering. I have in the past few weeks changed our walking venue, from the open spaces of the local park, to the more "enclosed" feel of the wooded paths of a nearby nature reserve. It's done wonders for Ted. He doesnt run off any more when he sees another dog, and is much, much better at recall. I dont bother taking the whistle any more. He sticks pretty close most of the time. The only downside is when he goes into deep undergrowth to poo and I have to fight my way in to clear up!

    Dont you just love the dog walking community? Almost without exception patient, tolerant, friendly and socialble. Dogs are such ice breakers, arent they?
     
  14. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    11,803
    Location:
    Andorra and Spain
    I'm doing "ignore other dogs" training with Shadow in an off-lead area. I have two BRIGHT yellow lead slips I have on his lead. One says "MY DOG NEEDS SPACE!" and the other says "ANXIOUS DOG!". They work brilliantly at keeping people at a distance we can work. I obviously don't expect people to change their plans of where they're headed, but it's noticeable how, since using these slips, people give me the time to get out of the way.
     
    Beanwood and Stacia like this.
  15. Beanwood

    Beanwood Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2014
    Messages:
    4,622
    I have been meaning to get something like that for Casper, just to avoid the bottleneck of people stood chatting with their dogs on leads that tend to make Casper anxious. Once he has a bit of space he is generally fine.
     
  16. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    11,803
    Location:
    Andorra and Spain
  17. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    11,803
    Location:
    Andorra and Spain
    The other thing I found is that, if Shadow does have a bit of a melt-down and starts barking from frustration, I get more sympathetic looks than judgemental ones. Not that that should matter to me, but it does :)
     
    charlie likes this.
  18. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2013
    Messages:
    22,603
    I never found yellow give me space markers helped at all! Usually because people weren't even looking in the direction of their off lead dog. :rolleyes: Or weren't close enough to read what it said on the harness/lead and couldn't recall their dogs anyway. It helped with on lead dogs though.
     
  19. Jenny B

    Jenny B Registered Users

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2016
    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Australia
    I try to train my dogs to stand behind me (as in heel - prefer a bit behind) so the oncoming dog has to deal with me before approaching my dog and I'll decide from there if they contact my dog. Well thats the theory. My thinking is friendly dogs are all well and good but your dog has to learn you get the say in case something charges at you that isnt friendly (and even if they eyeball your dog most dogs back off if you stand up to them and get their eye contact but you have to know your dog will be behind you).

    I've only come across one off lead dog so far with the puppy and we just stood and waited til the owner finally worked out their dog had wandered up away from their house (I did tell it to go home and it did stay away from us).

    In the past I have had dominant dogs & aggressive dogs off lead charge mine. The dominant ones changes their minds when I growled at them and the aggressive ones well their owners stop laughing at their little things when you threaten to kick them if they try to take a piece of your dog (nothing funny about little dogs trying to bail up big ones and their owners) but generally roaring at them and stamping your foot makes other non friendly dogs back off. But your dog has to be back out of the way. Even then they can nearly get bitten - our older dog now I thought one nasty dog did get him but it must have just missed and I was surprised as the owners didnt even seem to care as that was one of two I've ever had to take action against to protect my dog.
     
  20. Beanwood

    Beanwood Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2014
    Messages:
    4,622
    Thank you for the link, they look really good, and reasonably priced too. Just to give people a bit of an advance warning. The ones that know Casper are relaxed and friendly, usually call him from a distance, and stop and chat to him, not me! :D He calms in a instant usually, his anxiety dissolving quickly into huge body wags.
     

Share This Page