Help with recall

Discussion in 'Dog Training: Principle and Practice' started by JOY DONNAN, Feb 19, 2019.

  1. JOY DONNAN

    JOY DONNAN Registered Users

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    I am working through your total recall book. I have recently acquired a 3 year old German long haired pointer who is extremely well behaved apart from her terrible recall. She is what you would call an absconder. I am working through the book but wanted to know if while I am carrying out the training I am able to take her to a secure area and let her run as currently without attempting recall as I am lead walking her and she is not getting enough exercise and I think getting quite depressed.
    Your advice would be much appreciated.
    Thank you
    Joy

    Sent from my iPhone
     
  2. pippa@labforumHQ

    pippa@labforumHQ Administrator

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    Hi Joy, a secure area where your dog can run around freely and in safety is always beneficial, whether it's a secure yard, large garden, fenced tennis court, or any other well fenced enclosure.
     
  3. JOY DONNAN

    JOY DONNAN Registered Users

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    Thank you but my question was is it ok to let her run free in a safe area whilst I am still in the early stages of recall training or will this confuse the training?
    Joy
     
  4. lucy@labforumHQ

    lucy@labforumHQ Administrator Forum Supporter

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    Hi Joy, Are you worried about not being able to catch her when you want to go home?
     
  5. Debs

    Debs Registered Users

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    Hi, yes take her to a secure area and let her have a good run. When she is running towards you practice your recall and make sure you have fun with her!
     
    Michael A Brooks likes this.
  6. CPTCrash

    CPTCrash Registered Users

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    I am working on training with my 14 month old Lab Scout, i would say maybe about 60% of the time he does what he is told (sit, rest, come, etc...) but how do we get it to 100% of the time! I am pretty sure he know was to do he just sometimes seems to choose not to!
     
  7. Michael A Brooks

    Michael A Brooks Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    Hi @CPTCrash

    It's not possible to answer that question without observing your interactions with your dog. There are many, many reasons why a dog may not follow cue.

    I suggest you and your dog attend a positive reinforcement dog obedience club. The instructor should explain how to increase the number of successful repetitions.
     

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