How to stop labragators?

Discussion in 'Obedience' started by CiElBie, May 26, 2016.

  1. CiElBie

    CiElBie Registered Users

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    Well, I've been trying to train some good heeling, and by doing do I get Sunni to follow the hand with treats in it.

    However, he tends to get overexcited and bites/nips. A lot.
    And its really painful.

    The problem is that if I let him know he hurt me, he looses all his confidence and stops wanting to learn and repeat what hurt me.

    So, I guess I just suck it up and be a tough, strong woman?
    Thats probably the answer.
    Or maybe get some gloves? That may make it harder to handle the treats though.

    I can't throw them on the ground either, or else he will become the monster sniffing dog.

    I can't really keep the exercises calm either, he just isn't that type of dog. He adores working in itself and has a lot of drive, so I don't think I could manage to calm him down either. Not even that i'm using high value rewards, its just literally a couple of pieces of kibble.
    Rewarding him when he is calm may work perhaps, but I don't think he would actually be calm.

    Oh well, this here is only to talk about my pain. Aparently Malinois are called Malingators for a reason, if Sunnis overexcited nips hurt me this much, I wonder what it would be like with a malinois! Actually, I don't want to know thinking about it.
    Yeah, I should "man up" (no sexism here, just a saying)

    I could try to train him in a way which could involve less overexcitement, like training him to keep his nose to my hand, but I guess I like this method more as it works with him better.
    I don't think I want to change my technique to train him, I'm just complaining about how it hurts :p
    Anyone else have this problem?

    On good news, got an agility competition on sunday! Should be great fun, hope the weather turns out good!
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2016
  2. Boogie

    Boogie Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    How old is he?

    ...
     
  3. CiElBie

    CiElBie Registered Users

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    he's 3 now
     
  4. Boogie

    Boogie Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    Hmmmm - it is unusual at that age!

    My friend's dog never learned to take food gently so I do understand what you mean. Have you tried a treat which the dog licks instead of eats? (You'd have to train him first to know that it's just for licking, mind you!)

    ...
     
  5. CiElBie

    CiElBie Registered Users

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    No, I haven't... like those tubes of runny cheese or something? Perhaps that could work, though I wouldn't know where to get them from.

    Sunni knows how to take food gently, in fact, I worked on that so often, but he just gets so excited and forgets manners.
     
  6. Newbie Lab Owner

    Newbie Lab Owner Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    Dexter use to get excited when I was giving a treat in some instances, I think because I was so eager to give it to him as a reward, I hadn't payed attention to where it could lead to. I wondered how I'd get by this. Then reading The Culture Clash by Jean Donaldson, she wrote how it's important that dogs take a treat gently, even when excited as it helps them learn to be soft mouthed. She said to never let them take the treat, even if they have done the best behaviour ever, if they are snatching or you can feel their teeth. To do this hold the treat in your fist or fingers so that it is hardly poking out and let the dog work it out that you won't give it up until they are using only the very front of their mouths, more the lips, to take the treat. You may go through some pain from the teeth or pawing to start with but it really worked for me. Within a very short space of time, he got to grips with it. If you get use to giving Sunni a treat in this way when he's calm, you might find it less painful to do it when he's excited.
     
    Cyndy Vanswearingen and MaccieD like this.
  7. MaccieD

    MaccieD Guest

    Good suggestion from @Newbie Lab Owner , other options are not to have the treat in your but in a pouch that you reward from. Just make sure your hand smells of the treat and many dogs will follow. Another option is to train a hand touch and use that to walk to heel and then reward for good work.
     
  8. Luvmygoldador

    Luvmygoldador Registered Users

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    We have a yellow mix with golden retriever.(goldador). He is more lab though. He is a rescue dog. I had the problem with him snatching treats from my hand which resulted him bitting me. What I did was offer Bailey a treat, when he looked like he was going to snatch the treat from my hand I would immediately pull my hand back with the treat and say 'no, nice'. This took several days with several attempts before he finally got what I was expecting of him.
    I hope this helps.
     
    Cyndy Vanswearingen likes this.

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