New member! Should I get a 2-yr old lab?

Discussion in 'Introductions & Saying Hello' started by Karth, Jan 31, 2024.

  1. Karth

    Karth Registered Users

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    Hello all,

    I am a new member here. Seems like a wonderful community helping each other out. We are in Austin, TX. Me, my partner, 6 and 10 yr olds girl and boy.

    We want to add a show line lab to our family. Reading about it a common theme is the puppy stages are challenging. My 6 yo is a bit on the shy side and gets scared easy. Not sure I want her to feel uncomfortable with a velociraptor around! But my son is good with puppies and can manage the biting phase from what I have observed with the rescue pups we had fostered.

    Is getting a 2 yr lab a good idea? Will the lab bond? I’d be getting from a breeder as I want to know the entire history, especially behavior.

    Thoughts welcome. Thanks!
     
  2. Edp

    Edp Registered Users

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    Hello and welcome. It really depends on the dog. They are all so different. 2 year olds are generally overgrown puppies who have not settled down yet. They can be very exuberant! I would be concerned about the history and the decision making about why they are giving up the dog. It could work, but lots of back ground checks to be done including a good few introductory visits. Good luck.
     
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  3. Sammie@labforumHQ

    Sammie@labforumHQ Administrator Staff Member

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    Hi there, welcome to the forum! A puppy and a nervous 6 year can be a difficult combo for sure - it is manageable with baby gates and supervision - but taking on an older dog and skipping the baby phase definitely has advantages!

    They don't need to be with you from a pup to bond with you. We took on a five year old Lab just before our first child was born, and she adored us, and our kids, and was endlessly patient with all our children (there were three by the time she left us). She needed a little support to build a training relationship with me at first - but once she realised I was where the food came from, we were golden :D
     
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  4. Sammie@labforumHQ

    Sammie@labforumHQ Administrator Staff Member

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    Why they are giving up the dog is a great question. Are you specifically looking at breeders that keep pups on to train up and sell as trained/part trained, Karth?
     
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  5. Karth

    Karth Registered Users

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    Kind of. Speaking to a few breeders here it seems they keep a few from the litter for showing but later find that, due to some 'defects' (too short or some such reason), these pups are no longer showable. At that time they put 'em up for 'sale'. This is what I have gathered. With this I can kind of get the full background and have confidence that the older pup has been brought up with care.
     
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  6. Karth

    Karth Registered Users

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    Thanks Sammie, this gives me so much confidence!
     
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  7. Sammie@labforumHQ

    Sammie@labforumHQ Administrator Staff Member

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    You're very welcome. Taking on an older dog gives you a real opportunity to see what their temperament and personality are like before deciding whether they're a good fit for you - if you find a reputable breeder who's happy for you to spend some proper time with pup before deciding for sure, and they are giving them up because they have a preferred litter mate to show, rather than because there is a problem with their health or temperament, this could be a great option for you.

    Our dog's breeder insisted she came home with us for a weekend, *before* we made up our mind as to whether we definitely wanted to keep her - if you're offered a trial like this I recommend taking it up. For us it set any concerns to rest. But I know other families that have finished the weekend with a new insight into life with that dog and have bravely told the breeder it's a no. In both situations the extra time to get to know the dog was really valuable.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2024
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  8. Karth

    Karth Registered Users

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    I have a breeder who has a 2-yr old and has decided she will not be bred. No health issues and good behavior reported. But no offer of a try out. She is ok spending time a bit in her place but once taken it's final. I am mulling. Thanks a lot for your insights. It is very helpful!
     
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