Prepping chickens

Discussion in 'Raw Feeding' started by Annie & Bobby, Mar 18, 2018.

  1. Annie & Bobby

    Annie & Bobby Registered Users

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    I'm currently hatching lots of heritage breed chicks to start a mixed flock on my smallholding. There will obviously be lots of spare cockerels. Half of the family is vegetarian and nobody is terribly keen on the idea of killing them but it seems a shame to give them away for someone else to eat when I'm sure Bobby would really enjoy them.

    If I do manage to persuade the family, how much preparation would a chicken need before feeding? Would we need to pluck/skin/gut the bird or just give it to him as is? I'm thinking we'd get a kennel for him to eat it in rather than the kitchen!

    Bobby is fed kibble but has always self-supplemented with voles etc.
     
  2. Beanwood

    Beanwood Moderator Forum Supporter

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    You can either pluck and joint, or if you use the whole carcass you will obviously have to gut first.

    Personally, I would avoid feathers as they are indigestible and there is a small risk of getting a feather trapped on the way down. Just my opinion though!

    We don't tend to feed raw and prefer to bone, steam add veggies then pop in the freezer as portions.

    If you are using heritage breeds they do take a while to mature, a good 6 months. We tend to leave the boys together in a cockerel pen, for up to 8 months, and get a good 8lb carcass.
     
  3. Annie & Bobby

    Annie & Bobby Registered Users

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    You say obviously gut first. Are guts not suitable for dogs to eat?
     
  4. Beanwood

    Beanwood Moderator Forum Supporter

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    Yes, the gut is full of undigested food as well as bacteria. You need to remove that completely, as well as cutting around the vent area. The rest is fine for a dog.
     
  5. AlphaDog

    AlphaDog Registered Users

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    Mine eats whole rabbit head, ears, body and guts, which probably is the tastiest part. He's got lots of good bacteria to counter whatever he ingests. Still kicking. Same with fish. It all goes down.
     
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  6. Annie & Bobby

    Annie & Bobby Registered Users

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    Hmm, yes, Bobby eats whole rabbits, voles etc including the guts.
     
  7. MF

    MF Registered Users

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    I’d imagine he’d do the plucking himself and leave the feathers? Snowie has found and eaten dead seagulls washed up on the beach and left behind the feathers. If he did ingest any feathers - I think I saw a few go in his mouth - nothing untoward happened.
     
  8. SwampDonkey

    SwampDonkey Registered Users

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    Botulism can be a problem with seabirds please be aware of this when he goes near them :)
     
  9. MF

    MF Registered Users

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    Why is it particularly with sea birds?
     
  10. SwampDonkey

    SwampDonkey Registered Users

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    Not sure it's waterfowl and seabirds. Seagulls are notorious for it. Maybe their eating habits.
     

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