responding to calling when around other people

Discussion in 'Obedience' started by CocosDad_UK, Aug 5, 2015.

  1. CocosDad_UK

    CocosDad_UK Registered Users

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    I have this problem with an 'ignorant dog', my boy Coco seems it would be funny to ignore me when he seeing other people or with other dogs, but when were on our own hes good as gold and will always say near me and follow me when called. If there are runners or other dog walkers trying to get away he follows them and when i call he ignores me. Most people laugh at him and make a fuss until i catch up and put lead on him, but surely he should be listening to before running off in the first place. Any advise would be highly appreciated.
     
  2. Cath

    Cath Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    Have you not got Pippa's book Total Recall? If not I would get a copy and I am sure it will help you with your boy Coco.
    Good luck :D
     
  3. MaccieD

    MaccieD Guest

    Coco is only 14 weeks old so his training is only just really beginning. He is very much a baby experiencing the big wide world and all the fun it provides. As Cath has said try Pippa's Total recall book and take your time on each stage and proof against distractions. A useful tool is a long training lead to allow freedom but prevents him running off. At the moment the world is more exciting than you are :(, sad but true and he does not have a reliable recall. In this you certainly are not alone but help is available and you will have a dog with good recall by working at the training. :)
     
  4. Rosie

    Rosie Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    My guess is that every single lab owner on this forum has been through this! He is hard-wired to be friendly and want to play with people - it is one of the lovely things about labradors and nothing wrong with Coco! BUT it is a problem behaviour that can be not only embarrassing for you but potentially dangerous for him, so it is a high priority for training to address.

    Yes, I'd say get Total Recall (I got hold of it after I'd been on this forum for a while, and Pongo was 6 months old or so... I wish I'd got it earlier. You can get it as a kindle book from amazon if you like). Other people will give you much better advice than me on how to help Coco understand that he needs to stay with you rather than dash off to be bestest friends with everyone..... I am painfully aware that Pongo is NOT a shining example of a well-trained dog so I'll leave the advice to others!

    What I would say is don't expect miracles - labs are friendly, energetic dogs, and most people like to see them so when he does run off after others he will get rewarded by them (made a fuss of); it is not going to be quick or easy for him to learn to stay with you. But be patient and it will pay off!

    Good luck and let us know how it goes. (Now where has Pongo run off to now.....Pongo! come back here! Pongo! Pongo! )
     
  5. CocosDad_UK

    CocosDad_UK Registered Users

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    Thanks guys for the advise, I will take everything on board and look into buying the total recall book. I have got the happy puppy handbook too. Dont get me wrong he is getting better and better but slowly. I enjoy him playing with other dogs, its fun and improves his social skills but where there's people trying to get somewhere or dogs thats not interested it can be embarrassing.
     
  6. MaccieD

    MaccieD Guest

    With puppies I always try to remember that they are just babies so try to equate their behaviour with my own children. Did I really expect them to do everything they were told at a year old? No, so why should I expect my 14 week old pup to do everything. If you can see improvement in his behaviour your doing well but try not to expect an overnight change to Coco suddenly not being interested in his environment, and this is made worse by people outside wanting to fuss them when we are trying to regain control. Don't fret, you'll get there but perhaps a bit slower than you might wish :)
     
  7. Boogie

    Boogie Moderator

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    No, they can't 'think it's funny' - they don't have that kind of sense of humour. Dogs respond to the way we are, our body language and tone of voice especially. So we need to train them a step at a time, challenging them enough but not too much so they fail.

    Twiglet (11 weeks) is learning 'wait' at the moment. I go one step, come back, then treat. I will slowly get further away but if she 'fails' I will go closer again.

    This way of training works for everything. Set them up to win, challenge them just enough, then repeat repeat repeat without boring them. Then repeat in all sorts of different environments as dogs don't generalise like we do.

    It they seem to ignore you it's because you expected too much, too soon. Always think 'what did I do wrong' because the dog did nothing wrong - he just got on with being a dog!

    :)
     
  8. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

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    This. So much this.

    His environment is super exciting, especially when there are other dogs or people there to play with. It's your job to make yourself more exciting, not his job to come to you whenever you ask. It's quite handy to think of everything you ask him to do as a "job". He deserves to be paid for each job (well, you wouldn't expect to work for nothing, so why should he?). His "salary" may be food treats, it may be playing with a ball, a tug toy, a really good ear scratch - anything that he enjoys. The thing is, if you're offering him an ear scratch, but someone else is offering him a game of chase, then it's like having to choose between a job that pays you a fiver compared to something that pays you a hundred pounds. There's no question - he'll take the thing that gives him a better reward. Sensible dog. Of course, people very quickly think of this as disobedience when, in fact, he's just being a dog - choosing the thing that gives him more of a reward at that time.
     
  9. CocosDad_UK

    CocosDad_UK Registered Users

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    Ok guys, thank you very much for all your advise. I have taken it all on board and I am taking it too fast, we just come back from a very long walk along the beach and sea front and he was really good on and off the lead, wasn't stubborn and stayed by me. Did run off a little when other people was there but its a lot of improvement, I will do the things you have said over the next few weeks.

    Thanks again
     
  10. Rosie

    Rosie Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    That's great news!

    Just to depress you entirely (and prepare you....).... most of us have found that we can get our pups pretty good at listening and recall and so on, and we start feeling very pleased with ourselves......
    ..... and then at abotu 10 months old they hit adolescence and turn into deaf teenagers!

    So please don't be disheartened if you get a few set-backs - we've all been there!

    Enjoy your lovely boy. He looks a smasher.
     

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