The start of an exciting journey

Discussion in 'Ringcraft and Showing' started by snowbunny, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

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    She is a really good looking puppy. Her angles are so good they are verging on being exaggerated - you'll have to see how she grows on and see her in real life though, you can't tell from just one photo. Her head looks good, again very much bred for the ring and that short nose gives the slightly boxy shape that you see on a lot of winners today with a slightly exaggerated stop giving a rounded shape to her head - that could completely change as her skull grows.

    If she gets a decent length of leg going, she'll be a smashing looking dog. If she doesn't, there is a risk she'll look a tad heavy.

    Either way, she's very good show quality for sure. I'd put money on her doing very well.
     
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  2. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

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    Thank you, Julie, I know you know what you're talking about :)

    Either way, now she looks like a Labrador I'm very much besotted. As a 4-week old wrinkly wriggly worm, the adult dogs were far more interesting!

    She has a big limiting factor, and that's the two-legged novice on the end of the lead. But I'll do my best, assuming she enjoys it :)
     
  3. drjs@5

    drjs@5 Moderator Forum Supporter

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    She is absolutely gorgeous Fiona :inlove: More puppy envy from me...

    This is interesting to me.

    When screening for osteoporosis, although family history is important - as in, if a parent had a hip fracture from low impact fall (a fragility fracture) - weight is also important. Probably not as important as smoking, but luckily our dogs don't do that!
    With weight, if you are underweight, you have an increased risk of osteoporosis i.e thin bones. If you are overweight you have a tendency to thicker bones.

    Some of this might be related to hormones, in that oestrogen has a positive influence on bone strength, and fatty tissue converts male hormones to female hormones (hence feminisation in obese men).
    But also, bones become stronger the more you use them - running, walking, impact exercise, all strengthens bones, so the heavier you are, the stronger your bones are, and vice versa.

    This may be not at all relevant but I think is interesting. One of the benefits of being overweight is that I don't need to worry about osteoporosis!
    The other interesting fact is that fat cells (certainly in humans) do not increase in numbers after puberty, they just increase in size. So weight as a child is an important factor in managing obesity.

    None of it may be relevant, but hey ho!
     
  4. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

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    I can understand this inasmuch as one imagines an underweight elderly lady to be far more frail and brittle than a similar, but more substantial elderly lady - and I know it's true that weight lifting exercises are very useful for building bone density - but is it the same during the growth period as it is during maintenance and degenerative years?
     
  5. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

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    Also, does this relate to bone size? As we're essentially talking about the length ad girth for showing purposes rather than the density?
     
  6. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

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    We really need to remember here that there is a pretty solid base of research that supports believing that excess calories = rapid bone growth = increase risk of ED and HD in large breed puppies. This is the biggest risk here.

    I'd say anyone feeding a show line puppy any more than they need in a effort to 'grow more bone' is a bit bonkers.

    The kennel club advice contains a full list of references for anyone wanting to check out the studies:

    http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/get...or-dog/breed-and-size-specific-dog-nutrition/
     
  7. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

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    Replying to my own comment here, but when considering that frail elderly lady, the fact she is undernourished probably means she's lacking the proper nutrition to support healthy bones - and likely the impact exercises that help to build bone density. Whereas a puppy being fed a good diet for growth, with the proper balance of calcium and phosphorous, and with appropriate exercise, isn't in the same deteriorative position.

    I'm off to read studies now, to see if I come across anything groundbreaking ;)
     
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