Dog CPR a true lifesaver (UPDATE: emotional video added)

Discussion in 'Labrador health' started by MadMudMob, Jan 25, 2014.

  1. MadMudMob

    MadMudMob Registered Users

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    This is one of my personal missions - to spread the word on CPR for animals.

    Some years back our much loved mongrel, Pebbles Dog, collapsed and 'died'. It was only the fact someone had sent me this vid that let me bring him back.

    So, take note but hope none of you ever need to use it for real ...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AFrUiRIeVo
     
  2. Oberon

    Oberon Moderator Forum Supporter

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    Thank you for posting that excellent resource. I will take some time to study it.

    Edit: this important topic has been made into a sticky, meaning that it will stay at the top of the Labrador Health forum. :)
     
  3. drjs@5

    drjs@5 Moderator Forum Supporter

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    Thats really interesting.
    Sorry but I think I am going to hi-jack this by posting the human version at the bottom, but this has raised a couple of questions for me, and wonder if the veterinary folks among members might be able to answer them.

    In the human world we stopped suggesting the mouth-to-mouth bit of CPR for ADULTS a couple of years back, on the premise that doing chest compressions alone achieved enough movement of air into the lungs, but mostly because the circulation is paramount, and pausing to do the breaths stopped the circulation getting any form of oxygenation to the brain. Plus also people were more inclined to step in if they didn't feel pressured to put their mouth on someone else's :p The breathing and oxygen bits would then be taken over once the emergency services arrived.
    In CHILDREN the issues are different, they are much more likely to have an arrest of their BREATHING rather than their heart - choking being a common one, so for them the 15 chest compressions to 2 breaths is still the pattern.

    So, is this still the current version of pet CPR, and how effective would it be missing out the rescue breaths? Doggy ambulances coming in for scooping up clearly aren't an everyday occurence, so does this make a difference? Just wondering about this.
    Many thanks to MMM for posting this excellent resource.

    More cool than Nelly The Elephant.....Vinnie and [size=14pt]STAYING ALIVE[/size]....
    http://youtu.be/tD2qTmDsiHk
    Its a good tune to have in your head ;)
     
  4. Puppypal

    Puppypal Registered Users

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    Thank you for posting this MMM, you will never know when it will come in handy, hopefully not, but if the worse happens it is best to know what you can do to help :)
     
  5. wiggy

    wiggy Registered Users

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    Please dont shoot me on this one.

    I'm a IHCD Paramedic for nearly 20 years,

    I can count on one hand that any cardiac arrest is survivable, these ones have had a full cardiac arrest and arrested in front of me and my mate either in the house or in the back of an ambulance and had a belt via an defib within seconds.

    The woman makes it sound like you're going to save your dog's life....

    Don't get me wrong but any CPR is better than none, my wife yes, my dog no. You'd have no idea if your dog had any mental deficit, you'd have no idea if the animal was in pain after the event... it's not fair on the animal.
     
  6. Merla

    Merla Registered Users

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    Yes, wiggy, my sister's a paramedic too and tells a similar tale.

    Most of the miraculous recoveries seemed to have not actually been cardiac arrests in the first place (which, to be fair, is hard to tell if you don't have the tech or experience).

    That said, you could argue that maybe it's better psychologically for those witnessing the event to feel there's something they can do that might help, and for things like choking, as mentioned, it can help keep things going until help arrives, maybe, if you don't have the experience to be selective about probable cause and course of action. And it's unlikely to make things worse.

    It's a tricky one though. Sometimes awful things just happen.
     
  7. MadMudMob

    MadMudMob Registered Users

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    I hear what your saying but from personal experience I say it is most definitely worth trying however minimal the chance of success.

    I used it on my totally collapsed and not breathing Pebbles Dog - he took a huge breath after about 30 seconds and lived happily for another half dozen years.
     
  8. wiggy

    wiggy Registered Users

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    Not breathing for 30 seconds after a collapse is more likely to be a faint, fit or seizure.... protect the head, let dog fit, recover, with bags of quiet time and reassurance.

    Once again, dont shoot me, I cant see it being justified. There's 8 reasons for a cardiac arrest (the 4 H's and 4 T's) that are reversible. not one single one of them (unless in a vets where they have all the drugs) is survivable.
     
  9. Oberon

    Oberon Moderator Forum Supporter

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    What if a dog has drowned? Has it got value in that kind of situation?
     
  10. wiggy

    wiggy Registered Users

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver

    To be totally honest. IMHO, no.

    The lungs and stomach are full of water, and any resus be worthwhile you have to get the liquid out.
    Positioning will do a certain amount but it's really difficult.
     
  11. MadMudMob

    MadMudMob Registered Users

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  12. drjs@5

    drjs@5 Moderator Forum Supporter

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver (UPDATE: emotional video added)

    Gosh! - quite dramatic!
     
  13. Stacia

    Stacia Registered Users

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    Re: Dog CPR a true lifesaver (UPDATE: emotional video added)

    Quite tear making to watch. I wonder why the dog collapsed and do hope he didn't have a repeat.
     

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