Important information on dominance

Discussion in 'Labrador behaviour' started by editor, Jun 14, 2013.

  1. VAl

    VAl Registered Users

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    Re: Important information on dominance

    Thank you, it helps to hear somebody else has been TOLD!! I was wondering about her weight she looks good and is fit and healthy, probably too many treats, although doggy ones, and carrot, etc., will cut it down a bit, she has had more treats this last week as she could not or should not run around after the op, poor lamb was really bored!! Although she is our third lab, I have never really known what the ideal weight should be. Thanks again, Val
     
  2. VAl

    VAl Registered Users

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    Re: Important information on dominance

    Thank you, yes I think it was the environment, and she was probably trying to tell me not to leave her again even though she did go into the surgery happily, she has been fine today, but still have to take care for another couple of days. You have reassured me, I was really feeling worried and confused.
     
  3. Diselmommy

    Diselmommy Registered Users

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    Re: Important information on dominance

    Thank you !!
    I for one had problems back in the 90´s when I was a teenager and our yellow lab (bless her soul) would not obey me, only my parents. Not surprisingly, but back then we explained it with dominance theory. I was thought to have too little authority over her, and tried and tried to make her obey with that in mind. BIG FAILURE although we were awesome friends ;D. I understand the situation much better now being that my parents were the ones taking care of us and in the family structure Birta (translation of her name; Light) would not obey one of the kids, she was one of the kids!
    With great joy I have thrown that dominance thing out the window and our new puppy Disel is being trained with positive reinforcement only (and the occasional NO when he is really really acting up). But without all that frustrating dominance stuff.
     
  4. drjs@5

    drjs@5 Moderator Forum Supporter

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    Re: Important information on dominance

    Good on you Gudny!
    :)
     
  5. Suthuncat

    Suthuncat Registered Users

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    Re: Important information on dominance

    [quote author=Dexter link=topic=1705.msg12647#msg12647 date=1371198864]
    Thank you Pippa,

    I do get Dexter to sit down before I go through the door,especially the garden gates....it's basically just for manners ,feel bad now though as he doesn't need to be dominated ,and don't want him to feel he is,he is a good boy.I've got so much to learn
    On the point about delaying feeding my Husband and I fell out last week on Saturday because he was starving and wanted to order a takeaway but I said it would come an hour before Dex's meal time and I wouldn't enjoy eating it in front of Dexter when he was cranking up to being hungry.......so who's dictating the order of events in our house!he he!
    [/quote]

    i have orion sit when i clip his leash on or take his leash off, and he has to wait for my "okay!" release before going into the house... i do this primarily for manners, as he nearly knocked my little girl down the wood steps in our garage once in his rush to get outside to play..... is this still okay for me to do? i don't want to beat him into the ground by doing this, but i also don't want him hurting someone with his 90 pounds of joy to get outside. he also has to sit and wait when he is given his food (again, manners... as he would leap up and knock the food from our hands, then scoff it all!).
     
  6. editor

    editor Administrator

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    Re: Important information on dominance

    Yes, absolutely. All dogs should be well-mannered, for safety reasons, and to ensure that they are welcomed wherever they go.
     
  7. Ankita

    Ankita Registered Users

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    How to deal with a situation where a new dog (2.5 yrs cocker spaniel) is dominating or scaring my 3 yr old lab. my lab approaches her in a submissive way.lab looks away/avoid if cocker spaniel approaches her.
     
  8. Chandler&Co

    Chandler&Co Registered Users

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    Rachael is on point here! haha never had to deal with a dominance issue from my boys before, so thankful. Harmonious living all the way
     

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