Kennel runs

Discussion in 'Labrador Puppies' started by Oscar'sdad, Jul 12, 2018 at 8:42 PM.

  1. Oscar'sdad

    Oscar'sdad Registered Users

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    i have a 10 month old who is chewing a few things in the house like arm to sofa. I can’t shut him off in the kitchen easily so am looking at getting a kennel run for the garden with sleeping area. About 10’’ by 6’’. The garden is locked off and neighbours are retired so fairly safe. I come back at lunch for an hour for a walk. So he’s by himself for about 7hrs overall. Has anybody something similar. Do you recommend something like this?
     
  2. pippa@labforumHQ

    pippa@labforumHQ Administrator

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    Hi, for some years all our dogs (working gundogs) were kennelled but I have never kennelled a dog on their own. A big problem with kennelling a single dog that has been used to life indoors is barking. Dogs that would never dream of barking indoors will often bark in a kennel. Especially if they can see or hear neighbours or passers by. You'll need to make sure that the run is dog proof - which means a fair bit of expense. People often underestimate the height a dog can scramble over and the determination with which a dog will attack fencing if they really want to get out. The sleeping area is out of direct sun and drafts. Depending on where you live, heat or cold can be a problem.

    If you decide to go ahead, you'll need to introduce your dog to kennel life gradually a few minutes a day to begin with (start by just giving meals in the kennel) and work your way up to several hours.

    I have to be honest and say that I don't ever recommend leaving a dog on their own in a kennel. Partly because the barking issue with single dogs is so common. I don't kennel dogs in groups now either, mainly because of the risk of theft. How great that risk is will depend on your location of course, but where I am in Southern UK, dogs are stolen from kennels every year. Chains and fences don't stop thieves who use bolt croppers and are used to handling and dealing with large dogs.

    Keeping a dog off furniture in an open plan house can be challenging, but, you can buy some pretty substantial indoor dog pens nowadays, and extra tall or extra wide gates. That might be an alternative worth considering? Dog walkers or day care are other options.
     
  3. Oscar'sdad

    Oscar'sdad Registered Users

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    Thanks for the reply. I think I will try a dog gate to block off the lounge. There are double doors which close and you can push open as they interlock rather than locking like a normal door. I will see if the extra tall gates work. He is good and doesn’t chew the table or other furniture. Am reluctant to get a kennel for safety reasons and don’t want him to be an outdoor dog so will try this option. He is really good most of the time just think he is at that age really and not fully grown into an adult yet.
     
  4. pippa@labforumHQ

    pippa@labforumHQ Administrator

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    It sounds as though finding a system to use indoors would suit you best - and I bet he'll be happier in with the family. The furniture chewing thing will pass anyway once he is heading towards his second birthday, so any arrangement you set up indoors should only need to be temporary. Good luck and let us know how you get on :)
     

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