Labrador Size And Growth

Discussion in 'Labrador health' started by pippa@labforumHQ, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. pippa@labforumHQ

    pippa@labforumHQ Administrator

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    How big should a Labrador be? What is a healthy weight? And how much should puppies weigh at different ages? These are very common questions both here on the forum and over on the main website.

    The three most visited ‘weight’ threads are:


    Exploring the puppy weight thread is fascinating way to spend an hour or so, as it has over 1000 entries! We’ve compiled the result into a helpful graph or chart which you can find in the articles below.

    These excerpts below are from our size, weight and growth topics over on the Labrador Site

    When Do Dogs Stop Growing: Labrador Puppy Growth Chart & FAQ

    A lot of puppy parents ask us about puppy growth and weight. When do dogs stop growing? How big will my puppy get? And how much should my puppy weigh?

    How big (or small) your Labrador will be when he reaches his full size depends on a number of different factors. We'll be looking at those in a moment.

    Whether or not your puppy reaches his full potential in terms of size and when he does so, also depends on a variety of factors that can influence growth.

    Some of which you can control, and some of which you can't. We'll be looking at those factors too.
    First let's consider how long it will take your puppy to reach his full size. [Read the article on The Labrador Site…]


    How much should my Labrador Weigh? With Weight Chart

    Labradors come in a wide variety of sizes. So average Labrador Retriever weight figures can be misleading.
    As a very rough guide an adult female Labrador might weigh between 55 and 70lbs. An adult male Lab will weigh 65 – 80lbs.

    Female Lab weight will on average be lower than male Lab weight, but as you can see there is a considerable cross over.

    But Labradors also come in a couple of different types, and his type will have an impact upon his ideal Labrador weight.

    [Read the article on The Labrador Site…].

    Fat Labrador!

    Whilst exercise can help to keep your dog in shape as a part of their daily routine, it is not the critical factor when it comes to putting on weight.

    A dog may well need more exercise, but that is not why he is fat.

    He is overweight because when you take into account the amount he exercises along with a number of other factors, he has eaten too much.

    The exercise needs of your dog are an important but separate issue, which we look at in other articles. The important thing to remember is this:

    The less exercise you give the dog, the less you must feed him.

    You can’t be forever playing ‘catch up with his weight, or hoping to spend more time walking him next week. Once put on, weight is hard to shift and it will simply go up and up over time.

    You need to control it on a regular weekly/monthly basis, starting now. Here's how...

    [Read the article on The Labrador Site…]


    Don’t forget to add your own Labrador’s weight to the ‘How Much Does Your Puppy Weigh thread'. The more data we have, the more accurate the charts and graphs we can show you.
     
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  2. Ski-Patroller

    Ski-Patroller Cooper, Terminally Cute Forum Supporter

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    I would also mention that a puppies size at 8 weeks is not a good predictor of how large the dog will be. Cooper was a tiny puppy, but is a large tall dog. The Parents size is a better predictor.
     
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  3. mmv

    mmv Registered Users

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    I agree, puppy parents really do help in approximate size prediction. Our girl, Ruby, has a Mom who is small (55 lbs.) and Dad is a good size (70 lbs.). Ruby is 13 months and weighs a healthy 60 lbs. She was a bit chubby for a bit as we tried to adjust her food but her energy level is high and she loves to run!
     
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  4. Henry Mah

    Henry Mah Registered Users

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    newb parent and good to hear, ours just brought home at 8 wks is almost 7lbs. The whole litter at 4wks were all roughly the same size. Dad is quite large approx 80lbs and mum might be around 50.
     
  5. TheRealOtis

    TheRealOtis Registered Users

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    Hi all new member was curious about the size question I know it varies Otis is 30 weeks and has always been a big pup English Lab and he was on the scales a few days ago and goes 33kg (72lbs) seems reading this is alot I noticed he was a big boy at 4 months and I know its not the best comparison but I was at a food fest loads of dogs there so great for him as a new pup but i met an 18month old black male lab and otis may not of been taller he was definitely bigger in size and weight his brother Jax is roughly the same..... both been bought up on a raw diet from 8 weeks old fed twice a day with not many treats only training ones really and no human food maybe a scrap of ham on the rare occasion. Reading this now I feel like I've ended up with a real life Clifford....
     

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