Neturing advice

Discussion in 'Labrador breeding & genetics' started by nampah, Feb 9, 2015.

  1. Ski-Patroller

    Ski-Patroller Cooper, Terminally Cute Forum Supporter

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    Coopers first cycle was almost a non event, but there weren't in intact male around. Part of the problem is that you don't know the female pup well enough to know when she is fertile. I gather that it gets easier after a while.
    Our first Lab, Ginger, was a rescue who was spayed at 4+ years. Tilly we did at about 7 months and Cooper at about 16 months. We delayed Cooper because of the more recent recommendations to wait until they were pretty much full grown.
     
  2. Sarah B

    Sarah B Registered Users

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    I'm really unsure what to do about Loki re: castrating.
    The vet said they would do it about 5 months.
    Positive dog behaviourist where we do training classes said recommended but wait until fully grown.

    He's started having a little hump of his teddies which is not a problem but I'm confused all of the information I don't know what to do for the best
     
  3. IreneM

    IreneM Registered Users

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    Jesse is almost 6 month and he started when he was 5 month dragging his bed out and humping it a few times or tried on his Alligator. So far he hasn't tried with our new baby she is 4 month old. Our Vet won't neuter any dog until he is at least 7 month. I am just as confused by it all.
     
  4. snowbunny

    snowbunny Administrator Forum Supporter

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    I wouldn't castrate a boy at 5 months (or even 7); my personal belief is that is far too young. What will it achieve?

    My boy (now 2) tries to hump his spayed sister once every few days when he's over-excited. It's not sexual behaviour at all. He has only once ever humped another - female, spayed - dog, and the owner (a friend of mine) said that loads of dogs had been humping her. Not acceptable behaviour, definitely, and I called him off immediately, but it's hardly a "problem". Our neighbour's bitch has been in season recently and, because she's a free-range dog, spent a lot of time at our gate, howling to get to Shadow, until I took her home and asked the owner to shut her in. Shadow was interested, and whining to get to her, but he could still be called away and, because he is unable to roam by himself (the garden is fenced and walled), there was no chance of accidental puppies, even though the other owner was wholly irresponsible to let her wander free during her season.

    I think you need to consider why you are considering neutering. If it's just because it's what society dictates "preventing unwanted puppies", think about that. Is there really any chance of that happening? If there is, then maybe you should consider your management of your dog. Because, if he's always under your control, then there should be no chance.
    If it's because of behavioural issues, consider if they are sexually-driven behaviour problems. Things like pulling on the lead, jumping up, counter surfing etc etc likely won't change at all from having his gonads removed. That just needs training. Even difficulty with other boys (which Shadow has) is more of a training and desensitisation thing. It's very easy to believe that having him castrated would fix it, but what if it doesn't? What then? I would have just had my dog chopped for nothing. I could find out what would be more likely to happen to him by having a chemical castration, which is temporary and would give me a better idea, but it's really not a big issue for me, because of where I live. If it were, I would consider it, once all training routes had been exhausted.

    I'm certainly not anti-castration, and I know that some daycare facilities insist on it, so if you use one of those, you have to consider your options. If you believe that your dog will be happier - if he's one of those that becomes distressed when local bitches are in season, for example - then you can try Suprelorin to see what effect castration would have. If there's a medical reason, then of course that needs sorting out.

    I think you just need to think about why you are having him done. What difference will it make to him and to you. If it's just because it's "the done thing", question it. If you decide that you do want it done, then do your research into when is the best time. Read studies from outside your own country - the USA tends to neuter animals far, far younger than the UK and it has been linked to all sorts of health problems. The USA also tends to have a culture where dogs are left unattended outside more than in the UK, in which case, if you have no plans to change that, you need to consider the chance of unwanted matings.

    Don't be swayed by anyone's argument (even mine), just do your own research and act on what you think is best.
     
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  5. JulieT

    JulieT Registered Users

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    If you don't want a dog humping things, stop them when they are puppies. Just interrupt them, remove the item, and give them something else to do. Chopping bits off them to stop that is somewhat drastic! And it very well may not, anyway. I doubt humping a teddy is really testosterone driven, since lots of bitches will do things like this too.

    Personally, I'd have a boy dog neutered if I thought he had behaviour problems that were definitely linked to being entire, and I couldn't solve those with training. I supervise my dog, he is never out of my sight off lead, and I have a secure garden. I've never been prompted to neuter him - I have absolutely no reason to do so. Other people do have good reasons, but I think you need to consider your dog (I'd say when that dog is mature) and your own circumstances to make a decision.

    I do think teenage entire boys are more work than teenage girls though. I do think that the very high levels of testosterone do raise some issues, particularly in the way other dogs relate to an entire teenage male. I also think it's the case that an entire male may develop bigger muscles, and be a bit stronger (although plenty of neutered males are just as strong), and are a bit more desperate to interact with the environment, and also all that testosterone might make them somewhat over confident. All these things can be dealt with through training though. It has to be said that I'm certainly finding Betsy easier than Charlie, and I do think teenage entire males can be pretty challenging for a good while.

    I still wouldn't chop bits off them to deal with all of that, though. :)
     
  6. IreneM

    IreneM Registered Users

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    I appreciate all the information on this . Neither of my babies are wondering around in the neighborhood. They either on their leash or in a secured privacy fenced back yard and I am with them. They both baby and he can be a bit of a pest when it comes to her but if he gets to over excited I separated them for 5-10 min and it usually calms him down. I think after I heard we not going to consider having him neutered. I stop when he tries to hump the girl we have and it only happened once, but neither is sexual mature yet. I believe a lot is we only had her since Saturday and it is so exciting have a buddy to play with.
     
  7. JenBainbridge

    JenBainbridge Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    Me & OH are having this *exact* discussion right now with Stanley.

    He's nearly 7 months now and the vet said they would do it if he was 6 months+.

    OH is obviously of a "you are not touching my dogs bits" opinion - typical man. At first, I was quite adamant we were getting him done. But now I've done more and more research it just seems a bit unnecessary - he's not humping really - I've seen him do it to a couple of dogs and a few toys, but I'm talking a handful of times and it certainly doesn't seem sexual in my non-expert opinion. He is VERY excitable but most research suggests this won't change and he's certainly not aggressive. I'd be scared it would change his temperament more than anything.

    I think the deciding factor will be the dog next door. We have a beautiful golden retriever who lives in the adjoining house to ours, there's no fear of unwanted puppies but if her being in heat started to distress him then it could be something we'd have to consider.

    But right now it seems the sensible option to leave him as he is and see how we get on :)
     
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  8. Ski-Patroller

    Ski-Patroller Cooper, Terminally Cute Forum Supporter

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    All of our female dogs hump dogs/people/things occasionally, so I don't think "fixing" them has much to do with the behavior.
     

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