Why do people say this about labradors

Discussion in 'Labrador Chat' started by jenny200, Jul 11, 2018 at 5:55 PM.

  1. jenny200

    jenny200 Registered Users

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    Hi all

    So as most will know I decided with everyone's help on the beautiful Labrador:)

    I always wanted to ask why do so many people always say "oh he's lovely but he's hyper and mad as a hatter" to describe an adult lab ( I know young labs are mad as a hatter;)) and some say " he never tires and just runs like a lion in the house" but when you ask breeders or when I asked on here it's the opposite that there not hyper and are calm dogs? And then other I speak to say " only showlines are calm and mellow the workers are mad"

    I want to know are they calm or not?

    And is it true that showlines are calmer and mellower than working lines?
     
  2. EmmaHughes

    EmmaHughes Registered Users

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    Hi there sorry can’t answer your questions but we know Labradors are special to us.
    Suppose some are calm and some aren’t could be down to the genes or the way they are trained
     
  3. Edp

    Edp Registered Users

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    You will get a million opinions on this. My working lab from a glittering dynasty of field trial champs is the most chilled out dog ever. She’s a dream...not a show gene in her
     
  4. Stacia

    Stacia Registered Users

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    I have found that working Labs are calmer on the whole.
     
  5. Plum's mum

    Plum's mum Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    I grew up with show line labs (all girls) who were all lovely, calm, doting adult dogs. One was a bit mischievous at times but not hyper.

    My working line girl, 21 months, is sweet, soft and gentle. The only time I would ever describe her as hyper is when she's chasing and retrieving balls, but obviously this is channelled and as soon as the game stops she's back to chilled.
    I can't remember the last time she had a zoomie, more's the pity.

    I meet a lot of lab owners over the park and for as many labs there are they'll all have their own personality .
     
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  6. QuinnM15

    QuinnM15 Registered Users

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    They are all different, but I think Labs are known to be "puppyish" longer than some other breeds. It comes down to personality and training I think...our lab would not be described as hyper, and she's never jumped on people, so I didn't even need to work on that in our training. However, she requires a lot of exercise and attention, so to some that might mean hyper. She's been calm in the house since we brought her home at 7.5 weeks. There is a reason that labs are used as working dogs and guide dogs though...they are highly trainable!
     
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  7. Cath

    Cath Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    My two (male and female) are from working lines. They are both very calm and gentle dogs and have been from puppyhood.
     
  8. Joy

    Joy Registered Users

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    I don't think most Labs are 'hyper', but they do need more exercise /activity than some breeds and I wonder if some owners are just not prepared for this and expect the dog to be calm with just a wander down the street on lead once a day. Molly (who is a cross) and my last dog (who was a lab) both had about 2 hours of exercise a day - not all in one go. By this I mean off-lead walking, playing games with me, training etc.
     
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  9. Jojo83

    Jojo83 Registered Users

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    Each dog is an individual, just the same as we are. Temperament and training are the main elemdnts to a calm, chilled dog not whether they are 'show' or 'working' lines
     
  10. Emily_BabbelHund

    Emily_BabbelHund Longest on the Forum without an actual dog Forum Supporter

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    I've done a LOT of looking for a Lab and talking/meeting with breeders as well as meeting quite a few Labradors of Forum members. My own history is with Rottweilers (and ironically, poodles as a child). I've been in a lot of training classes with my own dogs and far and away the 'problem child' in nearly every class was a Lab. I used to think Lab owners were completely nuts for choosing such a crazy breed. I've currently got a Lab foster dog, and I still think Lab owners are nuts. :D

    So, here are my own personal observations...

    Working line breeders will tell you that the show lines are much more work...unfocused, hyper, harder to train. Show line breeders will tell you that those working line dogs are all complete hyper nutters who are high strung and touchy. I've met show line dogs that are hyper, I've met working line dogs that are calm. For me personally, the dogs I liked best were the 'hybrids' - a careful combo of show and working lines.

    I've also found that everyone's definition of 'hyper' or 'calm' can vary widely. I once visited a working line breeder who called in one of her dogs to sit next to her on the sofa to demonstrate to me how chilled out she was. That dog took over a half an hour before she finally settled down. To the breeder, this was a calm dog. To me, she was beautiful and vibrant, but anything but chilled.

    If you are looking at a breeder, try to see mum and if possible 'grandmum' and dad. Admittedly, that's not so easy to do. Ask the breeder what their definition of calm is. How many hours a day of exercise or training do they do to get a calm dog? Three hours a day may be the norm for them an unremarkable, but may be something that you think is enormous. Or vice versa, maybe you are a very active person who thinks nothing of a 10 mile hike.

    Same for a rescue, especially if the dog is being fostered. You can get a really good idea of how much exercise and training a day is needed.

    Your own lifestyle will also have a big influence. My dogs (all breeds) have been pretty active outside the house - romps on the beach, hiking, trips into town - but big couch potatoes inside the house. My current foster, Carbon, is a very zoomie puppy when off leash on walks and needs about two hours a day of such activity, but is currently snoring next to me on the sofa and that's pretty much all he does while we're inside. And he's definitely a 'working line' type. :)
     
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  11. selina27

    selina27 Supporting Member Forum Supporter

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    I agree with this totally. My 2 year old is lively and spirited sometimes, but to me it is just that :) and I love finding training outlets for this, it's just great to work together to channel her energy. But she is calm and settled and very chilled in the house, in the car and the vets and gentle round small children.

    She comes from a family who are both working dogs and household pets.
     

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